With the exception of Carbon-14, radiometric dating is used to date either igneous or metamorphic rocks that contain radioactive elements such as uranium. Now when the uranium or thorium disintegrates, the alpha particles which are emitted are slowed down by the crystals in which the grains of the uranium- or thorium-bearing minerals are embedded.

radiometric dating methods flaws-67

This proves that the half-lives of the uranium and thorium radioactive decays vary ... any age determination using this method of dating will be inaccurate because it is based on an invalid assumption." " ... For example, discordant dates have been obtained on the same rocks by ...

can we be sure the U and Th have always decayed at the same rates we measure today? (various) Given ample evidence observable in the present that decay rates have not been constant throughout the supposed deep time, it is not reasonable to assume they have been uniform through unobservable eons.

The second assumption is much more speculative since there is no way to verify whether or not some (or most) of the daughter element was already present when the rock solidified. However, in some cases, a few scientists are telling us that they have solved this problem.

The only dating methods discussed (over and over) by evolution-believing scientists and the mass media are those that supposedly "prove" that the earth is billions of years old.

One of the most popular of these is known as radiometric dating. can be In other words, something in the past caused a significant amount of helium to build up inside these zircons (such as from a rapid decay episode of uranium), yet, in spite of the fact that helium has been observed to leak out readily from these zircons, it has not done so: simply because it hasn't had enough time to do so -- suggesting that the zircons themselves are only a few thousand years old."There is evidence to show ...

However, not as well known is the fact that such methods have serious flaws which are often glossed over, or ignored when writing on, or discussing this subject in public. that (the) half-lives (of uranium-thorium-lead) are not constant but vary with time. comes from the study of pleochroic haloes which form in a rock in the following way.

Another pertinent thing that's also ignored, minimized, or scoffed at are the numerous other scientific methods of dating the earth, solar system, and or universe that yield much younger ages than 500 million years (max). When a rock crystallises, the crystals of the minerals in the rock often enclose minute grains of other minerals which contain uranium and thorium.

In other words, the magnitude of the radius of a pleochroic halo in a particular crystal depends on the half-life of the decay responsible for the alpha particle emission. the radii of pleochroic haloes corresponding to a definite decay in a particular mineral are ...

(the same) size, then it can be safely assumed that the half-life of that decay is a constant.