The data shown above come from the Facebook dating app, Are You Interested (AYI), which works like this: Users in search of someone for a date or for sex flip through profiles of other users and, for each one, click either “yes” (I like what I see) or “skip” (show me the next profile).When the answer is “yes,” the other user is notified and has the opportunity to respond. The graphic shows what percentage of people responded to a “yes,” based on the gender and ethnicity of both parties (the data are only for opposite-sex pairs of people).Unsurprisingly, most “yes’s” go unanswered, but there are patterns: For example, Asian women responded to white men who “yessed” them 7.8% of the time, more often than they responded to any other race.

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Its users skew older than Tinder’s—about two-thirds of AYI users are older than 35, according to a spokesperson.

says that white men who make a big deal about how much they’re open to dating women of color are actually not really that open to dating women of color.

But the results are more specific than that: men who believe in racial “colorblindness,” or men who claim to somehow not see race at all, are less likely to want to date women of color at all.

But that’s definitely a coincidence because they can’t any see race, right? After surveying 124 college-aged heterosezual men, 62 black and 62 white, the study found that while subjects in general tended to be attracted to women of their own race, those who endorsed multiculturalism, or the idea that different cultures and races can co-exist (therefore acknowledging their existence to begin with) were more likely to be attracted to another race.

In general, men responded to women about three times as often as women responded to men. All men except Asians preferred Asian women, while all except black women preferred white men.

And both black men and black women got the lowest response rates for their respective genders.Perhaps most surprising is that among men, all racial groups preferred another race over their own.AYI analyzed some 2.4 million heterosexual interactions—meaning every time a user clicked either “yes” or “skip”—to come up with these statistics.The men that believe in colorblindness, AKA denying acknowledgement of race in a (deeply misguided) attempt to somehow treat every single person the same way no matter what, were less likely to be attracted to black women.Interestingly, the colorblind ideology had the same effect on both white men and black men, who were also less likely to find black women attractive if they “don’t see color.”The authors of the study, researchers at Tennessee State University and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, noted that the study shows that trying to ignore the existence of race not only doesn’t work, but has the opposite supposed intent of racial harmony."These results are important because they suggest that it is more than a mere absence of prejudice that can foster interracial attraction but that a conscious commitment to the recognition and valuing of difference across race may be what is influential in interracial attraction," the authors wrote.The results are evidence of a phenomenon where white people claim to be above acknowledging any racial difference because white people truly can float through their day-to-day life without ever feeling the effects of racism.