Nearly 40% of single adults have used online dating websites or apps.

Using a large-scale sample of online daters in nine European countries, we engage in the first cross-national analysis of race-related partner preferences and examine the link between contextual factors and ethnic selectivity.

We provide a unique test of contact, conflict, and in-group identification theories.

We show that individuals uniformly prefer to date same-race partners and that there is a hierarchy of preferences both among natives and minority groups. Europeans living in countries with a large foreign-born population have an increased preference for minority groups.

Disclaimer: Please note that abstracts for content published before 1996 were created through digital scanning and may therefore not exactly replicate the text of the original print issues.

All efforts have been made to ensure accuracy, but the Publisher will not be held responsible for any remaining inaccuracies.

If you require any further clarification, please contact our Customer Services Department.

Online dating is becoming an increasingly prevalent context to begin a romantic relationship.

The ethnically heterogeneous Swiss population displays the strongest preference for minorities, with the more homogenous Poland, Spain, and Italy, the least.

Anti-immigrant attitudes are related to stronger in-group preferences among natives.

Unexpectedly, non-Arabic minority daters belonging to large-size communities have strong preferences for Europeans.

The results have implications for immigrant integration policies and demonstrate that Internet dating allows efficient selection by racial divisions, perpetuating country-specific racial inequalities.