Tona and Ayeni say that unlike the Ok Cupids of the Internet, their business model focuses on a highly specialized demographic.They compare themselves to other niche sites like Farmers Only or JDate."We believe that the black professionals have been underserved and people from this community will be willing to give our platform a chance," says Tona.

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They’ve just created a location-based app called MELD, available on i Tunes and Google Play, that caters to college-educated black singles.

"On all the major dating sites—OKCupid, Match.com, and e Harmony—it’s the same story: Black people—including professionals—have the lowest response rate out of any group," Tona tells me.

"They spend the most time reaching out and expressing interest, but do not hear back from the people on the other end." Race plays a significant role in a person’s success on an online dating site, as data repeatedly shows.

When OKCupid analyzed its own data, it found that black men and women get fewer responses than their counterparts from other ethnic groups. Last year, data from Facebook’s dating app, Are You Interested, showed exactly the same result: The odds on online dating sites are consistently stacked against black users.

Several sites have sprung up to cater specifically to the black community, including Black People Meet, Black Planet, and Black Singles.

But Tona and Ayeni believe that these sites are not meeting the needs of educated and high-earning black professionals."The reason that we believe we’re creating something that is unique and differentiated is that MELD is a curated list of educated black professionals," says Ayeni.blog, points out that the figures are even starker within the black community.More than a third of black people older than 25 have never been married, even though they say they would like to be.Black professional women, in particular, struggle to marry, continuing a trend that has been true for years: Back in 2009, ABC News reported that 70% of black professional women were unmarried.Could technology help to improve the marriage prospects for black professionals?