For example, the Ezra ban on intermarriage was different in that it was 1) Universal in scope, and 2) had the rationale that intermarriage was the profanation of the holy seed of Israel.She elaborates on these differences by saying that the prohibition at the time the Torah was written was not based on the ritual impurity of all Gentiles; rather, only the Gentiles of the 7 Canaanite nations that were specified were to be avoided.

Can jews dating non jews valentine dating site

Although most of the rabbis in the Talmud considered the Deuteronomic law to refer only to marriage to Canaanites, they considered all religious intermarriage to be prohibited at least rabbinically.

Gradually, however, many countries removed these restrictions, and marriage between Jews and Christians (and Muslims) began to occur.

In 1236 Moses of Coucy induced the Jews bespoused by such marriages to dissolve them.

with a Midianite woman (not from the seven Canaanite nations); this took place at a time when foreign (Moabite) women were inducing the Jews to perform idolatry.

In several places in the Jewish Bible, there are relations which appear to be intermarriages - for example, King David is described as marrying the daughter of the king of Geshur, Christine Hayes compares the Deuteronomic and Ezran viewpoints on intermarriage, and discusses in terms of ritual impurity and the fear of profaning the seed of Israel.

First and foremost, Hayes holds that the fear of profaning the seed of Israel was the underlying rationale for the ban in exogamous marriage, rather than the ritual impurity of Gentiles in general.

She also argues that the regulations on intermarriage in the times of Ezra were different from the restrictions on intermarriage according to the book of Deuteronomy.

Interfaith marriage in Judaism (also called mixed marriage or intermarriage) was historically looked upon with very strong disfavour by Jewish leaders, and it remains a controversial issue amongst them today.

In the Talmud, interfaith marriage is completely prohibited, although the definition of interfaith is not so simply expressed.

The Biblical position on exogamous marriage is somewhat ambiguous; that is, except in relation to intermarriage with a Canaanite, which the majority of the Israelite patriarchs are depicted as criticising.

The principle is essentially a general one, and the deuteronomic explanation doesn't clarify why it singles out the Canaanites in particular; one of the Talmudic writers took it to forbid all intermarriage with non-Jewish nations.