Here are some facts from the Center for Disease control about the prevalence of teen dating violence in the United States: Since many teens are confronted by dating violence dynamics, you can contribute to the health of your child’s relationship by recognizing the early warning signs of abuse.

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It may also include emotional or verbal abuse, behaviors like name-calling or insults.

Emotional abuse may include isolating a dating partner by trying to control the time they spend with friends and family, limiting the activities someone is involved in, or humiliating a dating partner through social sabotage.

Sometimes abusers use technology—texting, calls, instant messages, or social networking sites—to check up on a partner and try to control their behavior.

TDV may include sexual violence including any kind of unwanted or forced sexual contact.

Sexual control may also include reproductive coercion where an abuser sabotages his partner’s birth control, forces pregnancy and/or determines the outcome of the victim’s pregnancies.

The Teen Power and Control Wheel visually depicts the range of strategies that an abuser may use to gain and maintain power over a dating partner.

Teen Power and Control wheel TDV is a lot more common than most people realize.

According to the National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, teen dating violence (TDV) is a pattern of behavior that someone uses to gain control over his or her dating partner.

It is also important to note that “dating” is a term that adults tend to use to identify romantic relationships between young people; accordingly, that’s the term that we use in describing these dynamics on this page.